Frequently Asked Questions - Alberta Human Services - Government of Alberta

Frequently Asked Questions

Definitions

View a listing of commonly used terms along with a brief explanation as they pertain to Aboriginal people.

Show Answer Who is eligible to receive benefits?

You can find out about specific benefits provided by the federal government by contacting regional and district offices of DIAND, Health Canada or First Nation Band offices and Tribal Councils.

Show Answer Who is eligible for registration?

Important changes were made to the Indian Act in June 1985, when Parliament passed Bill C-31, An Act to Amend the Indian Act, to bring it into line with the Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms.

To find out more about eligibility for registration under the Indian Act, contact your First Nation Band office or the nearest DIAND regional or district office.

Show Answer How do I apply for registration?

Registration forms can be obtained from offices of DIAND, First Nations or Aboriginal associations and Aboriginal friendship centres. Send the completed form to:

Registrar
Indian Registration and Band Lists
Department of Indian Affairs and Northern Development
Ottawa, Ontario
K1A 0H4

Show Answer What are treaty rights?

Your rights as an individual treaty Indian depend on the precise terms and conditions of your First Nation’s treaty. Your First Nation Band council or DIAND office is the best place to learn more about the rights and benefits to which you may be entitled.

Show Answer Who is eligible for treaty payments?

Rights as an individual treaty Indian depend on the precise terms and conditions of your First Nation’s treaty. Your First Nation Band council or DIAND office is the best place to learn more about the rights and benefits to which you may be entitled.

Show Answer Who is eligible for first nation funds?

You may have the right to a share of any money distributed to First Nation members from the capital and revenue moneys belonging to the First Nation. This money usually comes from oil and gas royalties or from the proceeds from land claims settlements. Contact your regional DIAND office or your First Nation council for more specific details.

Show Answer Who can call the reserve their home?

To learn more about your reserve rights and responsibilities, contact your First Nation Band council or the Regional Director of Lands and Trust Services (LTS), DIAND.

Show Answer Must registered Indians pay taxes?

There are some situations in which Registered Indians do not pay taxes. Under sections 87 and 90 of the Indian Act, Registered Indians do not pay federal or provincial taxes on their personal and real property that is on a reserve. A pamphlet outlining how federal GST affects sales and purchases by Registered Indians is available from all Canada Customs and Revenue Agency offices.

Show Answer What about social assistance and welfare services?

Social programs are provided by federal, provincial, territorial, municipal or First Nation governments, depending on where recipients live. Registered Indians are eligible for federal benefits such as Canada Pension Plan, Old Age Security, Guaranteed Income Supplement and Child Tax Benefit. Your First Nation council or DIAND office can give you more details. Information is also available on their website.

Show Answer What sort of housing help exists?

Registered Indians have several options for housing assistance from DIAND and the Canada Mortgage and Housing Corporation (CMHC).

For more information about housing programs contact your First Nation council, the Regional Director of Funding Services, DIAND, or the nearest CMHC office. Information is also available on their website.

Show Answer Is education provided?

Elementary and secondary educational services are available to Registered Indian children living on reserves through First Nation-operated schools on reserves, provincially-administered schools off reserves, federal schools operated by DIAND on reserves.

Details are available at your First Nation council office or from the Regional Director of Education, DIAND. Information is also available on their website.

Show Answer Is help available for economic development?

DIAND has developed a number of initiatives to encourage and promote economic development in First Nation communities.

Aboriginal Resource Net is an online directory (developed by DIAND) of federal programs and funding sources available to assist Aboriginal people in developing new businesses or expanding existing ones. Information is also available on their website.

Show Answer What health care coverage is available?

Health services for First Nations and Inuit are the responsibility of provincial, territorial and federal governments. The federal government provides treatment and public health services in remote areas and public health services in non-isolated First Nation communities through the Medical Services Branch (MSB) of Health Canada. For further information, or if you need any of these services, contact your First Nation council or your regional MSB, Health Canada office.

Show Answer What programs are available for aboriginal youth?

Since 1996, the First Nations and Inuit Youth Employment Strategy (YES) has helped to expand existing community initiatives for Aboriginal youth or to develop new initiatives where none existed before. With the exception of the Youth Business Program, the First Nations and Inuit YES programs are highly decentralized and are administered by First Nation and Inuit communities. The flexibility of the programs allows for the development of activities based on specific needs and enables youth to have a sense of ownership and belonging to their communities.

DIAND’s YES initiative consists of five programs. To be eligible for these programs, you must be a First Nation youth living on reserve or an Inuit youth living in a recognized Inuit community. Other specific eligibility requirements are listed below.

First Nations and Inuit Summer Student Career Placement Program supports opportunities for career-related work experience and training to in-school First Nation and Inuit youth during the summer months. The overall purpose is to assist students in preparing for their future entry into the labour market. The program provides for wage contributions to create jobs for Inuit and First Nation students at the secondary and post-secondary levels.

First Nations and Inuit Youth Work Experience Program funds proposals from First Nation and Inuit governments and organizations to provide supervised work experience for out-of-school unemployed youth. Participants improve their job skills and future employment prospects while contributing to their communities. For a period of six to nine months, the program pays minimum wage plus benefits to eligible youth between the ages of 16 and 24 years.

First Nations and Inuit Youth Business Program focuses on out-of-school, unemployed First Nation and Inuit youth living on reserve or in recognized Inuit communities. This program enables Aboriginal lending institutions to offer eligible youth aged 15 to 30 proactive business opportunity advice and counselling, mentoring and advisory support, and seed capital to explore or develop a business opportunity.

First Nations and Inuit Science and Technology Camp Program promotes science and technology as career choices. Participants gain first-hand experience in various science and technology disciplines. The program provides funds to First Nation and Inuit governments or organizations either to design and run a science camp or to provide sponsorship.

First Nations Schools Co-operative Education Program funds proposals to establish or expand co-operative education programs in First Nation schools on reserves. The program creates school-based work/ study opportunities that provide meaningful work experience in a supportive environment.

To learn more about these programs, contact your First Nation council, hamlet office or regional DIAND office. Information is also available on their website.

Show Answer What about land claims?

The Government of Canada has been committed to settling Aboriginal land claims since 1973. Details are available in Federal Policy for the Settlement of Native Claims, a policy paper produced by DIAND for the Royal Commission on Aboriginal Peoples. Contact Publications and Public Enquiries (Kiosk), DIAND, at 1‑819‑997‑0380.

Show Answer What about aboriginal self-government?

Under federal policy, Aboriginal groups may negotiate self-government arrangements over a variety of subject matter, including government structure, land management, health care, child welfare, education, housing and economic development. For more information, please visit their website.

Created:
Modified: 2012-11-27
PID: 15543