Planning Supports for Your Family Member - Alberta Human Services - Government of Alberta

Planning Supports for Your Family Member

Developing the Individual Service Agreement

Table of Contents


Why is Planning Important?

Planning is an important part of Family Managed Services. Planning will help you think about your family member's goals and decide what kind and how much support your family member needs. This information will help you develop the Individual Service Agreement (ISA).

It is very important that your family member is involved in planning

Planning gives your family member the opportunity to set clear goals and make their own decisions. Planning will also help you and your family member measure progress and recognize your family member's strengths and abilities.

When planning with your family member think about:

  • How will you make sure your family member participates in planning?
  • What is your family member interested in and what goals do they want to achieve? What supports would they need to do this?
  • Does your family member have opportunities to try new activities and learn new skills?
  • How will you and your family member keep track of any progress made towards your family member's goals?
  • How will you make sure you and your family member think about, and if necessary, make changes to the goals on a regular basis?

Areas of Planning

Consider the following areas when planning with your family member:

  • Building meaningful relationships and connecting to the community
  • Being fully involved in making decisions
  • Being healthy and safe
  • Being effectively supported by staff

These areas will help you think about what your family member needs to have a good life and what you can do to help.

As you read through these areas, think about:

  • Your family member's needs
  • What natural and community supports are available and how you can make use of them
  • What PDD program funded supports would help your family member meet their goals and have a good life

Did you know?

Your PDD regional staff can provide you with information on other resources that may help you plan.

Building Meaningful Relationships and Connecting to the Community

It is important for your family member to contribute to and feel part of their community in the same ways as their friends, neighbours and other family members. Having meaningful relationships with family and friends is important for helping create a sense of belonging and value.

It is also important for your family member to have choices. They must have the opportunity to make decisions about the things they want to do and the relationships they want to build.

When planning with your family member think about:

  • Does your family member have a sense of belonging and connectedness to family, friends, and community?
  • Does your family member have the opportunity to develop natural supports such as relationships with friends, family, neighbours, and other members of the community?
  • How can you help your family member make their own decisions about the activities they want to do and the relationships they want to build and maintain?
  • Does your family member have the support to develop interpersonal skills and build relationships with others (with and without disabilities) that are meaningful and satisfying?
  • Does your family member have enough opportunities to engage in community activities?
  • Are there any community resources that could be used to learn about social, volunteer, employment, cultural and leisure activities?
    • Examples: public libraries and city recreation centres
  • Are there any skills/activities that your family member would need support with to help them participate in community activities of their choice?
    • Example: using public transit to go to the theatre with friends

Being Fully Involved in Making Decisions

It is important for your family member to make their own decisions because they know themselves best. Supporting your family member to think about what is best for them, makes it possible for them to control their own lives, make their own decisions, and express their own views.

When planning with your family member think about:

  • Is your family member confident and comfortable taking on new challenges?
  • Does your family member have opportunities to learn about their rights and responsibilities as an adult citizen?
    • Examples: to speak and be heard, to be treated equally and with dignity
  • Does your family member have opportunities to build decision making abilities and express their views?
    • Examples: what they believe, whom they associate with, where they live, what they do, what they wear, and how they spend their money

Being Healthy and Safe

If your family member is healthy and feels safe then they are better able to handle life's challenges and lead productive, fulfilling lives.

Being healthy

When planning with your family member, think about:

  • How is your family member's physical, emotional and mental health maintained (e.g. nutrition, regular exercise, regular health care visits, appropriate medication administration)?

Being safe

When planning with your family member think about:

  • Is your family member supported to be safe in the community and free from abuse?
    • Examples: learning how to prevent and report abuse; learning ways to deal with unsafe situations; carrying medical and personal identification such as their doctor's phone number, medical alert bracelet, etc.
  • How can you make sure your staff increase their understanding of how to prevent abuse and take steps to incorporate this as part of their daily work?
    • Example: Abuse Prevention and Response Protocol
  • How can you make sure appropriate safety precautions are in place?
    • Examples: emergency responses, fire safety procedures, proper storage and use of hazardous household products and medications

Other things to think about:

In providing support to your family member there may be times when you or your staff will need to respond to a particular event or concern to make sure your family member and/or the people around them are safe.

When planning with your family member think about:

  • How will you respond to unanticipated situations or behaviours that are of concern?
  • What procedures can you use to manage behaviours in a positive way and how will you regularly monitor these procedures to make sure they are effective?
  • Which qualified person (e.g. psychologist) should you talk to as part of this planning?
  • Has your family member given you informed consent for any plan to manage behaviours in a positive way that is put into place? Have you documented this?
  • Is your staff trained to manage behaviours in a positive way and make use of procedures such as planned restrictive procedures in response to anticipated situations or behaviours of concern?

Being Effectively Supported by Staff

As a Funds Administrator it is important that you understand your role in providing the best possible staffing supports for your family member. You must have a good working relationship with your staff. It is also important that the staff has a good working relationship with your family member. This will lead to a better quality of life for your family member.

When planning with your family member think about:

  • How will you make sure you hire the best staff possible?
    • Examples: Criminal Record Check, Vulnerable Sector Check, First Aid certification
  • How will you make sure your staff has the skills to provide support that meets the needs and preferences of your family member?
    • Examples: lifting, positioning, feeding, medication administration, use of adaptive aids
  • How will you encourage your staff to make use of community resources for information and to develop the skills and knowledge needed to support your family member?
    • Examples: library, public health nurse, workshops
  • How will you make sure your staff provides supports that make it possible for your family member to achieve their goals, connect to the community, build meaningful relationships, and be fully involved in making decisions in a safe and healthy environment?
  • How will you monitor staff on the amount and quality of all supports provided to your family member?
  • How will you find out if your family member is content and satisfied with the support provided?
  • When and how often will you meet with your staff to discuss the progress of your family member and identify any challenges in order to resolve them before they become problems?

Other things to think about:

It is important to make sure your family member is treated with respect. By protecting their human and legal rights as an adult citizen you affirm their human dignity and worth.

When planning with your family member think about:

  • How can you make sure your staff understand and advocate for your family member's human and legal rights?
  • How can you make sure your staff provides support in a way that respects your family member's human and legal rights as an adult citizen?
  • How can you make sure your staff uses other methods of communication to help your family member make decisions and express their views?
  • How can you make sure your staff understands how to communicate effectively with your family member?

Developing Your Individual Service Agreement

The Individual Service Agreement is a plan developed by you and your family member that describes the kinds of PDD funded supports your family member needs to help them achieve their goals.

The PDD program funds 3 types of services:

Want more information on the types of support the PDD program funds?

Talk to your PDD regional staff. They can help.

  • Home Living and Respite Supports
  • Community Access Supports
  • Employment Supports

The Individual Service Agreement can be in different formats but certain information needs to be included. In the Individual Service Agreement, you and your family member need to:

  • List the goals your family member wants to achieve this year. Remember these goals must be ones that the PDD program can help with
  • List the type(s) of PDD program funded supports your family member needs and how much
  • Make a list of the responsibilities of your family member and/or their legal guardian
  • Make a list of the responsibilities of the Funds Administrator
  • Decide on what process you will use to make changes to the supports in the Individual Service Agreement, if necessary
  • Decide how you will let the PDD program know if you want to change the supports in the Individual Service Agreement
  • Decide how you will let the PDD program know if you want to stop getting supports

Did you know?

In some cases, the Funds Administrator is also the legal guardian. These are two very different roles.

The legal guardian is responsible for making decisions in the areas where they have been given decision-making power. This job may include working with your family member to decide which supports should be included in the Individual Service Agreement.

The Funds Administrator's job includes hiring staff to provide PDD program funded supports. This job includes working with your family member to decide which supports should be included in the Individual Service Agreement.

Keeping these roles separate is important. This is why if you are the legal guardian and the Funds Administrator for your family member you will have to sign the Individual Service Agreement in two places.

SAMPLE Individual Service Agreement

This Individual Service Agreement is a sample only. Feel free to change it to suit your needs or to make your own.

Created:
Modified: 2013-07-19
PID: 15065